FAQ

Frequently Asked Questions

If you do not respond to the ticket within 15 days, you will be convicted of the offence you have been charged with and will be required to pay the fine. If you do not pay your fine on the due date, any of the following may happen:
  • For certain offences, including parking infractions, the Ontario Ministry of Transportation could refuse to issue or validate your vehicle permit.
  • For certain offences, including speeding, your driver's licence could be suspended.
  • You will be charged an additional administrative fee.
  • Your defaulted fine will be referred to a collection agency.
  • Your defaulted fine information will be given to a credit bureau.
Early resolution is an opportunity to try and resolve your charge. This means you or your legal representative must go to the courthouse at a specified time to discuss your case with a prosecutor. If no one appears on your behalf, you will be convicted that day.

This isn’t the best choice if one is hoping to get their charge withdrawn. If a ticket holder instead chooses the “trial date” option on their ticket, and the officer fails to attend court without good reason, or there is some flaw with their testimony, the court may very well have grounds to withdraw the charges.

At an “early resolution” meeting, the officer isn’t required to attend, and in most cases you won’t be able to review your disclosure (the officers’ notes and the rest of the case against you) beforehand. In practically all cases, the prosecutor will only offer a plea bargain to a reduced charge with lower points and/or possibly a lowered fine. But if a valid case exists, why would it make sense to consider a plea bargain?

While plea bargain’s are always certainly in the best interest for the courts from a revenue standpoint they might not always be for you. With the “trial date” option, you can at least ensure there’s a valid case against you. The strength of the case against you is something that with a bit of legal information from Winston, you can be on your way to determining yourself. And if you cannot, Winston can always direct you to a trained and vetted paralegal who can help you with or take over your case.
Demerit points are points that can be added to your driver’s licence if you are found guilty of breaking specific driving laws. All drivers start off with zero demerit points.
Demerit points stay on your record for two years, starting from the day you were ticketed. If you collect enough points, you can lose your driver’s licence.
FULL G LICENSED DRIVER
  • If you get 15 or more demerit points as a Ontario driver with a full license (G Class), your license will be suspended for 30 days.
  • It is also possible that your license may be suspended if you receive 9 to 14 demerit points as a full licensed (G Class) driver. You may be asked to attend an interview to discuss your driving record. If you have to attend an interview, you will receive a letter (Notice of Interview) which will state the time, date and location of the meeting. Your license could be suspended if you do not attend the interview.
  • At this meeting, you will need to explain why your licence should not be suspended. You will be required to pay $50.00 for your demerit point interview. You can pay the fee in person at any ServiceOntario center. Failure to pay the interview fee will result in the cancellation of your driver’s licence.
G1, G2, M1, M1-L or M2-L LICENSED DRIVER
  • If you get 9 or more demerit points as a Ontario driver with either a G1, G2, M1, M2, M1-L or M2-L license, your license will be suspended for 60 days.
  • It is also possible that your license may be suspended if you receive 6 to 8 demerit points as either a G1, G2, M1, M2, M1-L or M2-L licensed driver. You may be asked to attend an interview to discuss your driving record. If you have to attend an interview, you will receive a letter (Notice of Interview) which will state the time, date and location of the meeting. Your license could be suspended if you do not attend the interview.
  • At this meeting, you will need to explain why your licence should not be suspended. You will be required to pay $50.00 for your demerit point interview. You can pay the fee in person at any ServiceOntario center. Failure to pay the interview fee will result in the cancellation of your driver’s licence.
One ticket may or may not increase your insurance. This really depends on your insurance policy as well as your insurance company. You can contact your insurance company if you wish to find out more.
You may receive demerit points on your Ontario driver’s license if you violate laws in provinces and territories outside of Ontario, the State of New York, and the State of Michigan. The following traffic offences committed outside of Ontario can add demerit points:
  • speeding
  • failure to obey a stop sign
  • failure to obey a signal light
  • failure to stop for a school bus
  • racing
  • failing to remain at or return to the scene of an collision
  • careless driving
Convictions stay on your driving record with the Ministry of Transportation for three years. Demerit points stay for two years. Usually, insurance companies keep this information for five years. But, keep in mind police officers can see your complete driving record and criminal history going back to the day you were born.
You can surrender your license in one of two ways:
  • in-person at any ServiceOntario centre or;
  • by mailing your licence to the Ministry of Transportation’s Driver Improvement Office.
NOTE: You CANNOT surrender your license at DriveTest centres.
One amount is the set fine. The second amount is the total payable. The total payable consists of the set fine, court costs, and the victim fine surcharge.

You will pay court costs for the service of the ticket upon conviction of an offence. The amount is set by regulation (see Section 60 of the Provincial Offences Act).
The Ontario government adds a victim fine surcharge (VFS) to every non-parking fine. It is deposited into a special fund to help victims of crime.

The amount of the VFS is typically 20% of the imposed fine. For example, a $100 fine would result in a $20 surcharge. However, fines over $1,000 carry a surcharge of 25 per cent.
This depends on your situation.
  • If you are going to trial, you can ask the Justice of the Peace for extra time to pay your fine during sentencing. The amount of time you are given may depend on many factors such as the Justice who is hearing your case, the amount you are required to pay, the circumstances of your case, and your explanation as to why you should pay a lesser fine.
  • If you are already convicted and need more time to pay your fine, visit the appropriate courthouse for your ticket. There you will have to fill out a form. The form will require you to input information including how much of your fine you have paid so far and a date that you would be able to pay your fine by. The form will be reviewed by a Justice of the Peace.
  • If you have just received a ticket and want to pay your ticket, but cannot pay it right away, you will be required to see a Justice of the Peace at the appropriate courthouse for your ticket. There you will have to plead guilty and ask for extra time to pay.
There are many ways an officer can determine how fast you are going. Here are a few:
  • Using a radar gun (Radar can be used while they are driving or stationary)
  • ‘Pacing’ your vehicle (Officer follows your vehicle in his car, trying to maintain a constant distance. Officer takes a look at their speedometer to determine if you are speeding.)
  • By aircraft (people in an aircraft use a stopwatch or VASCAR system to detect your speed and are in contact with officers on the road).